Feed others not yourself, Tubby McChurchian.


No, this is not a warning to those engaged in the character assassination of others while deeply embedded in the sin of gluttony that comes from too much fried chicken. I wouldn’t lower myself to that. Who am I kidding, I totally would. But I’m not. Right now.

This is about our excess and selfishness and greed in the American church and some ideas to help you combat that.

See, In the churches where I have served, we have had food pantries. We have given out the food to people from the community who needed help but tried to limit it to church members who were struggling. This is due, in part, to professional pantry vultures that actually schedule their lives around when various charities are giving away stuff. We always want to help when help is needed but we also want to be sure to adhere to the biblical idea of “if you don’t attend here, we can’t help you”.

editors note: yes, that was all sarcasm.

Now, one week we decided that we must meet the needs of the poor, wherever they are but we didn’t think Jesus would wait around in a big building and have the poor come to Him. So, we decided to take the food to them, the voiceless, lonely lurkers out there who may very well be convinced that no one cares anymore. Now, we had a pretty sizable population of illegal immigrants there, they mostly worked in the cheese factories, it being Wisconsin. They also happen to be both the poorest section of the community and also the most unreached. So, we had a little hand-out printed up in Spanish, then loaded up an SUV and headed out.

Along the way, we stopped at a new tattoo parlor in town and I introduced myself to the owner. Turns out he was an ex-punk, ex-Skinhead like me and around the same age. I explained that I was a Pastor and had come to see him and to tell him to either repent or perish. I joke, I kid.

Actually, I explained that I was a Pastor and then showed him my sleeves (for you squares out there, sleeves are full arms done in tattoos, I didn’t show him my shirt sleeves, that would be strange.) he was of course really taken back by this and told me that he had never met a Pastor with tattoos. He noticed some of the tats that I have right away, like the Exploited screaming skull and the Doc Martins.

Soon, we had a great conversation going on in which he told me how he used to be a Catholic and really didn’t have a problem with the church, just church people. I told him that I agreed with him and felt the same way. In fact, I told him about how Jesus dealt with the religious leaders of His day and how he had told them that whores and tax collectors would go into the Kingdom before them. Anyway, I offered to come and hang out with him and he seemed to really want me to, which was cool. He may not know it yet, but God is finding him.

Then we were off to find some poor folks. We would go to places where we knew that someone was struggling. We knocked on the door, introduced ourselves (if they spoke English) or handed them the Spanish hand-out if we had to. We explained that we couldn’t eat ourselves without them having enough and that Jesus cares about them even if Christians don’t.

At one place, there was a young Mexican girl who answered the door. The front room was very, very cold (this is Wisconsin in January). She let us know that she couldn’t find work and had three small kids. She didn’t heat the front room and just heated the bedroom with an electric heater. She was out of diapers and food and very far from home. Can you imagine what that must be like? I then asked her if she needed potatoes and she was very excited, then I noticed two small potatoes wrapped in Saran-Wrap on top of the fridge, they were only eating small bits at a time.

I ran to the store and bought some diapers and we gave her food and asked if she needed blankets. This was repeated over and over that afternoon. I told the person with me that if that were us, to have someone come and offer the things that we needed so badly, when it seemed that no one cared- that would be a miracle in my book.

There is all of this desperation, all of this need, right outside our doors. And how will we face God? I have the answer for it and it is quite simple; we will face Him exactly like the Rich man from Luke chapter 16, who fared sumptuously and those outside his gates got the scraps.

We give God the extra and keep the bulk for ourselves, so self-satisfied that if we give anything at all, that is more than most people do. But you are not called to be slightly better givers than most people, you are called to live a life of consecration and giving all that you have to meet the needs of those that Christ called “blessed”.

Isn’t that amazing? When you or I call someone or something blessed, we do so with the full (mis)understanding of Jewish covenant that Jesus railed against. The notion that to be rich is to be blessed while to be poor is the markings of God’s displeasure or even His curse is from the Old Covenant. When Jesus detailed who the blessed truly were, He named off the poor, the hated, the sorrowful, the persecuted. And it is to these same people that the sheep were applauded for serving and the goats were rejected for overlooking. Which one are you?

Someone once said that “if a child dies from hunger while a Christian sits full, that person is guilty of murder” and I can see where they are coming from. We have separated ourselves from the hurting and the poor by so many degrees of separation that it no longer affects us as it should. We do this, like the rich man with his walls and gates, to protect us from the inconvenience of giving. And like him, the dogs have more mercy than we do so many times. And in a world where we spend more on dog food than missions, the irony of this is overwhelming.

What would it look like if we practiced real community? What if our first job in the church was remembering the poor and way down at the bottom of that list were new buildings and padded pews? What if we set ourselves to the practice of seeking and saving the lost, regardless of where they fall on the income scale? What if we stopped planting so many churches in Suburbia and began reclaiming the abandoned and dilapidated areas of our communities. And from there, we walk and meet needs and provide services to those who cannot repay us?

I will tell you, we would begin to look like the church.

What if we stopped all the singles programs, recovery groups and movie nights geared towards keeping a lethargic church interested and began instead to use the wisdom and skills found in our membership to train people how to balance checkbooks, fix an engine, clean a home, apply for school? What if we made it our business to save the lost and completely eradicate poverty all around us?

What is stopping us from being the church right now? What stops us from having less so that others can have more? Why do we recoil at the idea of emptying our barns of all that we have stored up and instead, emptying them onto those who have nothing so that they have enough? Friend, we must go into all the world, that is a command. But don’t go empty-handed, take your wooden trophies that the world has bestowed on you for being such a productive member of it with you as you go. Real Christianity is not about having more and more for yourself, it is about giving more and more to others in the name of your Lord who gave all for you.

After all, charity is nothing more than giving back what you yourself have stolen.


Vintage Reconciliation: The Supererogative Christian Life

When I survey the wondrous cross
on which the Prince of Glory died;
my richest gain I count but loss,
and pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
save in the death of Christ, my God; all the vain things that charm me most,

I sacrifice them to his blood.

See, from his head, his hands, his feet, sorrow and love flow mingled down. Did e’er such love and sorrow meet, or thorns compose so rich a crown?

Were the whole realm of nature mine, that were an offering far too small; love so amazing, so divine,
demands my soul, my life, my all.

When I survey the Wondrous Cross
Isaac Watts 1707


SUPEREROG’ATORY, a. Performed to an extent not enjoined or not required by duty; as supererogatory services.

A Japanese Christian widow was surprised one night by a robber in her home. Upon startling him, she took notice of how hungry he looked, he was obviously starving. So, she calmed him and prepared him a meal. After the man had finished, she handed him the keys to her home. By this act of normal Christianity, he became a believer.

Normal Christianity is not what we would consider to be normal today at all. How a truly normal Christian conducts their self will always be considered to be supererogation by abnormal Christians and the world. We must ask ourselves what can rightfully be considered to be supererogatory as it applies to the Christian life? As we look at who we are and how we conduct ourselves in this world, what is “normal” Christian behavior and what is above and beyond the call of duty?

A recent report concluded that the average Christian gives 2.3% of his or her income to the church. Based on those numbers, giving 10% would be supererogative to today’s average Christian.

Most of us spend our week working a job, taking kids to sports, shopping for groceries and watching television. For these people, going to church twice in a week might be supererogative.

We attend high school, college and amass huge amounts of debt in order that we can pursue the career of our choice. Once there, we try to succeed as much as we can in order to provide for our children and retire comfortably.

For these average Christians today, throwing all of that aside to become a Missionary would certainly be considered to be supererogative.

What about witnessing your faith? Selling your extra to give to the poor? Selling all you have to do the same?

Praying for an hour a day? A half hour? Praying at all?

Cleaning the church? Cleaning the church alone and telling no one that it was you?

Would these things seem supererogative to you?

What did Jim Elliot, the famous Missionary to Ecuador consider to be supererogation? He claimed that “He is no fool who gives up that which he cannot keep for that which he cannot lose”. He later proved that as he was martyred by the Auca Indians on the banks of a river in the jungle.

And what of Elisabeth Elliot, Jim’s wife? What did she consider to be supererogative? After her husbands death, Mrs. Elliot remained among the Indians that murdered her husband in order to win them to Christ.

For Christians, in our service to man, there can only be supererogation. Supererogation is the normal Christian life, everything that falls short of that is flesh, natural and human. We must continually go above and beyond the call of duty in our living example of Christ’s great love and sacrifice.

Watchman Nee relates a story of an event that he witnessed in his native China.

“A brother in South China had a rice field in the middle of a hill.In time of drought he used a waterwheel, worked by a treadmill, to lift water from the irrigation stream into his field. His neighbor had two fields below his, and one night he made a breach in the dividing bank and drained off all his water.

When the brother repaired the breach and pumped in more water his neighbor did the same thing again, and this happened three or four times.

So he consulted his brethren. “I have tried to be patient and not to retaliate, ” he said, “but is it right?” After they had prayed about it, one of them observed, “If we only try to do the right thing, surely we are very poor Christians. We have to do something more than what is right.”

The brother was much impressed. The next morning, he pumped water for the two fields below, and in the afternoon, pumped water for his own field.

After that, the water stayed in his field. His neighbor was so amazed at his action that he began to inquire the reason, until in due course he too found Christ.”

As Believers, we must never simply ask, “what is right?” Instead we must ask “What is Christ-like?” For in His earthly life, Christ never did what was required only, he did as His Father wished. His question never seemed to be, “what is right in this situation?” but rather, “what is like my Father?”

In the story of the Good Samaritan, the Samaritan did not just stop to check on the man who was robbed and beaten, did he? No, he stopped and bound his wounds with oil and wine. Surely, that was doing right, wasn’t it?

But he did not stop there. He then, placed the poor man upon his own beast and he took him to an Inn. Certainly, he had now done right and could walk away satisfied.

But instead of being satisfied with what he had done, after doing all of this, he then handed the Innkeeper two days wages for the care of the man he had rescued. Any one of us would very possibly never go to such lengths in our service to a stranger. And yet, this Samaritan was not quite done.

He proceeded to instruct the Innkeeper that whatever costs he incurred, above and beyond (supererogare) what I have given you already, I will repay when I return. This is the standard of our service to the world. And this is the example that Christ himself gave us in showing the great love of God towards mankind.

The world themselves operate in a basic understanding of simple right and wrong. When disaster strikes, they will begin to deploy aid, raise money and give generously to the cause. They will defend those who are wronged and champion the downtrodden. But simply spending yourself in a just cause and doing right is not a Christian trait.

Over-spending yourself until the world can see the Imago Dei, the image of Christ in your lavish sacrifice of all you are and all you have, that is a Christian trait.

Seeing this then, that all of our dealings with each other and the world must be supererogative, what then can be considered to be supererogative in regards to our service to God? What is enough service, enough sacrifice, enough suffering, enough self-denial? Can you go beyond the call of duty in regards to your service to God?

There can be no such thing, friend.

As it relates to our service to God, there can be no supererogation.

No price, no sacrifice, no struggle can ever be considered above and beyond the call of duty until your sacrifice surpasses that of Christ’s towards you.

“Were the whole realm of nature mine, that were an offering far too small; love so amazing, so divine,
demands my soul, my life, my all.”


Spirit Filled Evangelist

We are in transition as a ministry. It has been a long, strange trip and it feels like many pieces are finally falling into place. Today, one of the final pieces rolled into place as we felt the mandate to roll power gift evangelism back to the forefront of what we do.

There is an incredible lack of Spirit filled Evangelists in the church right now, they simply do not fit in with most Pastor’s personal agendas. It could be added however that most of those Pastors do not fit in with God’s agenda.

We need a return of men speaking to communities with more of the truth of the Word and a demonstration of the supremacy of Christ and less pandering to the whims of the world system with seeker sensitive church growth methods.

We have totally lost our way, my friends, and looking for yet another new church is not the answer. Those of us that feel this to be true must transition now away from a compromised system and into one based upon the manifest power of God and confrontational truth.

How badly we have swerved away from the truth is easily demonstrated. Awhile ago, I was given a gift for visiting a church on a Sunday morning. The church was an Assembly of God and they gave us June’s copy of “Today’s Pentecostal Evangel”. Inside was an article on “The Changing Face of Evangelism” and there was a picture of Billy Sunday and some hipster that I didn’t know.

Anyway, as I read, I became livid.

The first comment that caught my attention was the following, “Gone are the days when a camp meeting was a big event in town”. I thought to myself, “Okay, that’s just an opinion. It lacks foresight but I can agree to disagree with that.” Then I read further “An Evangelist supplements by providing a particular specialty that may not be the local Pastor’s strength, such as teaching on Spirit baptism.”


“The Evangelist complements by teaching the people from a second voice that confirms what the Pastor has been sharing with them.”

Are you kidding me? That is the job of the Evangelist in the church, to complement the local Pastor? And this was coming from the AG! I’m sorry but I don’t know what books they are handing out in Springfield for leaders to read but apparently it isn’t the Bible anymore.

The reason that we are at a .02 percent growth rate for new conversions is because the evangelist has gone as extinct as the Dodo bird. When the people who carry the anointing and calling of God that acts as the means of grace for God to save a soul are busy confirming what a Pastor is saying, no one will be getting saved. When our evangelists spend all of their time going inside churches and no time outside of it, we are in trouble. When they must “book dates” and raise money, they cannot focus on their calling because they have become businessmen instead of prophets.

How did we ever get here?

Here’s is the revelation that we must get right now: you are besieged, church. You are trapped behind the four walls of your church by the enemy outside and the only ministry that you know is to other besieged people. You are devouring one another and defining ministry gifts by what you can do while you are besieged, not by what God had intended for us as His church!

The job of an Evangelist is not to supplement a local Pastor. The job of an Evangelist is to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the world, in the world. But our Evangelists are not Evangelists anymore; they are travelling preachers with a career agenda and money on the brain. In fact, I don’t even think that I personally know an Evangelist other than Mario Murillo right now.

Let me lay this out for you- it is time and high time for a coup d’church; a radical overthrow of all of the things that we know are wrong in the system but do nothing about.

What is our current state, you ask? Well, let’s take the Moravian Church for instance, who at one time held a 24/7 prayer ministry for 100 years while sending out over 300 missionaries to areas unreached by the Gospel message. Today many of them doubt the infallibility of the very Word that scores of them gave their lives for in the past.

When those who should lead us have fallen into secularism and liberalism, it is time for a coup d’church.

Methodist women used to have “pray-in’s” where they all sat as a group in front of the doors of local taverns and prayed, refusing to move and refusing to allow anyone inside. Methodists used to hold camp meetings where God moved, people repented and were saved. They used to send circuit riders all over the country, covering rural areas with the good news. Today they are now mainstream and neither God nor the people move.

When the new wineskin becomes the old wineskin, unable to contain any new wine, its time for a coup d’church.

We could mention the Salvation Army or the Presbyterian Church and how far removed they are from the radical manifestations of revival in their past.

We could mention Pentecostals who now too dignified to have the gifts of the Spirit operate in public or the Word of Faith folks who took revelation from God and started commanding stones to become bread for their own use.

The list is too long and too painful for me because I love the church. But I cannot abide what a church does to people when it is based on lies, compromise and the world system.

The disease of the church is systemic and what change can come to it must come from outside of it, period.

We must take what we can from the past and never lose them while being sure to lose everything that came later as a result of the compromises of weak men. To be clear, I am calling for an outright revolt where it is deserved. I am calling for a coup in the church because they are simply not competent to lead us into the future.

Let us love them but get free. Let us wish them well but move on. Let us hold no malice but not compromise an instant longer. Let us harbor no bitterness but press forward.

The days of revival are coming, mark my words. But Saul’s armor does not fit and simply singing in the camp is not the battle that we were born for. There is no revival because the people that God has chosen to ignite it refuse to break free and seek him until he is found.

That is you.

You were born for better than this. You were placed on this planet for a time such as this, enginneered by God for the Hell you would see. But you have to be that person right now, throwing off all restraint and the chains of men. Because you are the change that you have been waiting for